How Marco Rubio and Ted Cruz are hurting rather than helping the Latino Community

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The first time I hear the derogatory term “gusano” (worm) to refer to Cuban Americans is in 1975 during my freshman year at Amherst College. It is created by the Castro regime as a propaganda tool; refers to (and is solely meant to) discredit the entire group of Cubans living outside of the island; created to discourage collaboration and communication between Cubans on the island and off the island and created in order to make two sides of an ethnic group become enemies, instead of family, based on their geography. I never live in fear of being in the United States during my 58 years but I am concerned now. I feel the country is exploding with the Donald Trump juggernaut imperiously headed for the Super Tuesday Primaries while Marco Rubio and Ted Cruz continue to destroy each other (plus US as Latinos in the United States.) And there is nowhere to run to or nowhere to hide while the specter of political assassinations weigh heavily on my mind. A new civil war is on the horizon should this occur and I am at an age where people like me will be the first to be either put in an internment camp or liquidated.

Back Story:
At the recent gathering in Nevada of Democratic Hispanic leaders, ahead of the GOP debate in Las Vegas, photos of Cruz and Rubio were plastered alongside Trump’s picture, as all three were criticized as anti-Latino. A press release noted, “While Trump continues to grab headlines with his hateful anti-Latino, anti-immigrant language, the positions and records of the two Latino presidential candidates in the race are equally dangerous.”

Dolores Huerta, an influential labor leader and civil rights activist, has called Cruz and Rubio “sellouts” and “traitors” at the gathering and said the Hispanic candidates are turning their backs on the Latino community. Partisan politics aside, the question remains: Are Cruz and Rubio ‘traitors’ to Latinos or do they just have different views?
Latino USA asked several noted Latino politics observers. Here is what they told them:

Esther Cepeda, Nationally syndicated columnist, The Washington Post Writers Group “It’s true that all’s fair in love, war and politics so from a tactical perspective trashing Latino politicians on policy makes sense. However, in a time when so many others are demonizing Hispanics, it’s disconcerting to see our own ripped apart on the basis of their fealty to an amorphous idea of what Latino identity should be. Cruz and Rubio’s politics and policies are fair game, criticize away. But it denigrates all Latinos when some of us decide to become arbiters of what is or is not “truly” Latino. We spend a lot of time telling people outside the Hispanic community to understand that we are not monolithic – we should follow our own advice.”

Stephen A. Nuño, NBCNews.com contributor and Associate Professor, Department of Politics and International Affairs, Northern Arizona University “The truth is that Latinos have great potential to contribute to all sides of the political ledger if only those in the GOP would see the greater long-term opportunity in expanding the party message rather than consolidating it with white voters. I think Latino organizations, both conservative and liberal, are right to challenge Cruz and Rubio on their policies, but to suggest that one’s loyalty to identity rest on certain leaders’ assertion of a political test, and to cast accusations of ‘traitor’ should they not pass that test, is no less fascist and dogmatic as the Trump crowd.

Pilar Marrero, Senior Political Reporter, La Opinión “Even before all of this activism and partisan campaigning started pointing fingers at Cruz and Rubio, we wrote a couple of stories about the inconsistencies between these two politicians life stories or family stories and their positions on immigration and other issues of interest to most of the Latino voters in this country. We should hold politicians accountable, and not just the Republicans, the Democrats too. All of them. But if these two are going to be a “threat” to democrats by peeling off latino voters, they have a lot of work to do. I am not convinced either of them is a threat at this time. First, there´s an issue of the Republican brand, which is seriously damaged among Latinos and getting worse thanks to continuous demagoguery on immigration and race. Then, there´s the fact that most Latino immigrants in this country are Mexican and these two are Cuban. And Mexicans know that Cubans, even today, still have a privileged immigration status that basically offers legal residency and public assistance as soon as they set foot in the country or come to the border to request refuge status.”

Albert Morales, Director of Latino Engagement, Democratic National Committee “Ted Cruz and Marco Rubio are both using extreme rhetoric and backward-looking policies that would be harmful to every American, including Hispanics, by dragging us back to the economic policies that were in place on the way to losing 8 million jobs, to seeing foreclosure signs paper streets all across America, and when hard working and middle class Americans of all backgrounds had to choose between bankruptcy and getting the health care they needed. That both of these candidates are the children of economic and political refugees from Cuba only makes the tone of their campaigns and their tax-cuts for the wealthy economic policies that much more offensive.”

Supported by Maria Hernandez Bryan López Figueroa Luis Chaluisan Federico Chaluisan L.f. Chaluisan Batlle WEPAwebTV Roughrican Productions Rocker Roller Rican vlɒɡ Salsamagazine.com 2014 Recognition Awards WEPAwebTV – New Edge Theater WEPAwebTV – New Edge Theater
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Salsa Magazine 6 Year Anniversary Luis Chaluisan

clasicos

On February 10, 2016 we are celebrating Six Years of Publishing Salsa Magazine Daily on FB. We not only focus on Classic and Contemporary Salsa Music/Latin Jazz but offer a look at a variety of Arts that Latinos are involved with in the United States to advance our culture as The Second Majority. This includes Theater, Film, Art, Fashion, Education, Politics, Culinary Arts and Academic Symposiums. Our Archives include Audio and Filmed Performances dating from 1973-Today. The template for the Magazine is based on Latin NY Magazine (1973-1985) launched by Mr. Salsa Izzy Sanabria in 1973 where I begin my career as a Reporter/Editor in 1977. The Member subscriber Data Base on FB has exceeded 10,000+ readers while our Google Plus support stream for the Magazine has reached 3,596,960+ views since its May 10, 2011 inception. In the interim We successfully create the Salsa Magazine Top 40 Salsa Awards in 2012 plus help promote Documentaries (From Mambo To Hip Hop-The Latin NY Salsa Explosion-Rocker Roller Rican) to name just a few of our Professional highlights. We feel one important aspect of the E-zine is that mainstream professional Broadcast and Print Journalists from both the English and Spanish speaking worlds utilize our Magazine for leads on important stories that we feature. In closing, we are grateful that we are acknowledged by these journalists for being one of the most positive outlets for Latino news in the Social Network Universe. Esa Va! Y Adelante!
Luis Chaluisan
Managing Editor
Salsa Magazine
As part of our Six Year Anniversary we have produced a 30 Minute Virtual Concert. Enjoy! WEPAwebTV Clasicos De La Musica Latina – Salsa Magazine Luis Chaluisan
Included in this Broadcast: https://lnkd.in/bnne2yR
1. Celia Cruz Declaraciones Sobre El Bárbaro Beny More
2, Cheo Feliciano Eddie Palmieri – Busca Lo Tuyo
3. Daniel Santos con la Sonora Matancera
4. El Gran Combo De Puerto Rico – Moforibale Al Tambo
5. Elias López y La Compañía Ya Es Muy Tarde Canta Junior Toledo
6. Eliot Cintron – Trombón en el 35 Aniversario de Bobby Valentin
7. Grupo Mi Son con Amadito Valdés
8. Joe Arroyo – Bam bam kiribim bam bam
9. Joe Ruiz – Bilongo
10. Los Naranjos – Échale Candela
11. Louie Ramirez Y Super Banda vocal Jorge Maldonado – El Titere
12. Luis ‘Perico’ Ortiz – Canta Domingo Quiñones
13. Marvin Santiago – Fuego a la Jicotea
14. Orquesta Aragon
15. Orquesta Aragon Rafael Felo – Bacallao
16. Sociedad 76 – La Solución de la Salsa
17. Tito Rodríguez – Vitin Aviles
18. Wayne Gorbea y Salsa Picante
19. Willie Rosario Canta Gilberto Santa Rosa – Al Fin Te Fuiste

Presented by: Official Salsa Magazine Dominican Republic/Film Editor Maria Hernandez WEPAwebTV – New Edge Theater WEPAwebTV Roughrican Productions Rocker Roller Rican vlɒɡ Salsamagazine.com 2014 Recognition Awards WEPAwebTV – New Edge Theater Official Salsa Magazine Political Analyst Federico Chaluisan El Extreme Luis Chaluisan Official Latino Pop Culture Editor L.f. Chaluisan Batlle Official Salsa Magazine Rocker Roller Majestic Times Official Magazine House Band Orq Espada Tony Gonzalez Marco Ocasio Douglas H Long William Fluker Official Salsa Magazine West Coast Editor Tina Chaluisan Culinary Editor Bryan López Figueroa Columnist RevCarmen Hernandez Official Salsa Magazine Restaurant Las Canteras Peruvian Restaurant DC Gary Lee Offiicial Salsa Magazine News Anchors Gerry Brooks Randall Pinkston Official Salsa Magazine Guest Columnist Emily Stork Official Salsa Magazine In House Comedian/Actor Rob Torres Official Salsa Magazine Hall of Fame Coati Mundi Official Magazine Latin Jazz Representatives Papo Vazquez Willie Williams Carlos Jimenez Official Salsa Magazine Book Publisher Steve Cannon Official Salsa Magazine Salsa Dura Hall of Fame Virgen Milagros Orta Official Salsa Magazine Poet Activist Deborah Magdalena Official Salsa Magazine Soneros Casimiro JR Rodriguez Viktor Amauri Balaguer Viktor Y Los Callejeros Official Salsa Magazine Nueva Onda Representative Angela Rijos Official Salsa Magazine Hall Of Fame Historian and Guide Orlando Marin Official Salsa Magazine Comedy Night Host and Theater Director Mark Philipp Official Salsa Magazine Hip Hop Representative Loco Mic Michael Pizaña Official Salsa Magazine Mayaguez Big Band Representative Peter Vega Official Salsa Magazine Spiritual Adviser Miguel Angle Sanchez Official Salsa Magazine Health Issues Adviser Katy Olan Official Salsa Magazine Mambo Era Adviser Ida Carlini Official Salsa Magazine Fashionista Pedro Chaluisant Official Salsa Magazine Latin Rockers Ray Carrion Steve Adorno Lori Rose Official Salsa Magazine Latino Film Festival Organizer Veronica Caicedo International Puerto Rican Heritage Film Festival Official Salsa Magazxine Author Activist Lawayne Orlando Childrey Official Salsa Magazine Nueva Onda Indie Country Western Artist Abigail Ray Hillman
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The Life And Music Of Tito Rodríguez Luis Chaluisan Salsa Magazine 87 Min.

The Life And Music Of Tito Rodríguez Luis Chaluisan Salsa Magazine 87 Min from Luis Chaluisan Y Batlle on Vimeo.

The Life And Music Of Tito Rodríguez Luis Chaluisan Salsa Magazine 87 Min. https://vimeo.com/142528570
Tito Rodriguez is an important contributor to our musical legacy. There are more than 1,453 signatures so far to give Tito Rodriguez a posthumous Grammy Award. Take a moment to sign the petition if you have not done so already. http://www.gopetition.com/…/the-recording-academy-posthumou…
Vocalist, percussionist, band leader, composer, producer, label boss Tito Rodríguez was ‘equally talented as an uptempo improvising sonero (singer in the salsa style) and a romantic singer’. ‘At its peak, the Rodríguez band’s blend of Cuban-orientated numbers and tight, solo-filled instrumentals equalled any of his rivals’ (quotes from The Latin Tinge by John Storm Roberts, 1979). At the age of 16 he played maracas and sang second voice with Cuarteto Mayari before relocating to New York to live with his older brother Johnny (b. 10 October 1912, Camuy, Puerto Rico), who had moved there in 1935. Popular vocalist/composer Johnny formed his own trio in 1940; recordings he made with his trio on the Seeco label were collected on Encores De Johnny Rodríguez Y Su Trio and Siempre Favoritas De Johnny Rodríguez Y Su Trio.
Rodríguez’s first job in the city was with Cuarteto Caney. After brief stints with Enric Madriguera and Xavier Cugat (as a singer and bongo player), a year in the US Army was followed by a spell singing with Noro Morales. El Dinamico Tito Rodríguez was a reissue of a Morales collection with Tito. In 1946 Cuban pianist/composer José Curbelo recruited Rodríguez and Tito Puente (on timbales) to his band, which became an ‘incubator’ for the future New York mambo sound. Recordings made by Curbelo’s band during the two years of Tito’s period of tenure were later compiled on Los Reyes Del Mambo. In 1946, while Curbelo’s band were appearing at the China Doll nightclub, Rodríguez met a Japanese American chorus girl called Tobi Kei (b. Takeku Kunimatzu, 23 January 1925, Bellingham, Washington, USA), whom he married a few months later. In February 1947, while he was still with Curbelo, Tito participated in a recording session by Chano Pozo for Gabriel Oller’s SMC label, which included the Machito band, Arsenio Rodríguez and Miguelito Valdés. Curbelo sacked Rodríguez in 1947. The band leader had given him a day off to look after Tobi, who was sick, but someone informed Curbelo that Rodríguez spent the day drinking in a bar. Tito was unemployed for some months.
After leading a short-lived quintet, which he formed in late 1947, Rodríguez organized a trumpet conjunto (group) called the Mambo Devils in mid-1948. With them he recorded eight tunes for SMC, four of them arranged by Puente, who went on to become his musical antagonist. Tito later expanded his outfit to a big band, which he led until 1965. In 1949 he signed to Tico Records, formed in 1948 by two shirt label manufacturers, George Goldner and Art ‘Pancho’ Raymond. Rodríguez had to rename his band the Lobos Del Mambo (Mambo Wolves) as the aggrieved Oller objected to the use of Mambo Devils. He did two stints with the label, between 1949 and 1953 and between 1956 and 1958, during which time he released 78s, six 10-inch volumes of mambos and various 12-inch albums. Material from both these periods was later compiled on Nostalgia (1972) and Uptempo (1978). Tito made no records during 1950 because a wrangle between Goldner and Raymond suspended all recording at Tico. He resumed recording the following year when Goldner took charge of the label. In pursuit of the crossover market, Rodríguez switched to RCA Records in 1953 and his discs on the label sold well. Ritmo Y Melodia, 15 Joyas Tropicales (1990) was the most recent compilation of material culled from his RCA period. On his return to Tico, he issued Wa-Pa-Cha (1956). His final release for them was Señor Tito Rodríguez (1958). In 1960 he signed to United Artists Records on the basis that he would be the only Latin band leader to record for the company. His first album on the label, Live At The Palladium, was a great success. Conflict over top billing at New York’s famous Palladium Ballroom and elsewhere was an aspect of the rivalry that existed between Puente and Rodríguez.
In 1962, Rodríguez had three consecutive massive hits: ‘Vuela La Paloma’ (From West Side Beat), ‘Cuando, Cuando’ (from Back Home In Puerto Rico) and ‘Cara De Payaso’ (from Tito Rodríguez’ Hits), which were all number 1 in Puerto Rico and other South American countries. Rodríguez and his band recorded Back Home In Puerto Rico during a two-week stay on the island in June 1962. His return was marked by official government receptions and heavy media coverage. He tried to find fame in Las Vegas with a revue, but it flopped and he made a heavy financial loss. Tito also recorded as lead singer with La Playa Sextet, whose line-up substituted the electric guitar of their Puerto Rican leader, Payo Alicea, for traditional piano. A compilation of La Playa Sextet cuts with Tito on lead vocals was issued under the title, Tito Dice… Separala Tambien!. In 1963 he issued the Latin jazz Live At Birdland, which featured the jazz musicians Zoot Sims, Clark Terry, Bob Brookmeyer, Al Cohen and Bernie Leighton. The same year Tito had a huge hit of over one-and-a-half million sales with the smoochy string laden bolero ‘Inolvidable’ (Unforgettable), contained on From Tito Rodríguez With Love. The song was written by Cuban band leader/pianist Julio Gutiérrez. He followed this with a series of soft romantic bolero albums, interspersed with uptempo collections like Tito Tito Tito, on which accompanist Israel ‘Cachao’ López’s championing of Latin jam sessions (descargas) was spotlighted on the opening track ‘Descarga Cachao’. The Rodríguez/Puente feud was reflected on some of the recordings Tito made for Musicor Records, such as ‘Avisale A Mi Contrario Que Aqui Estoy Yo’ (Tell My Adversary I’m Here) from Carnival Of The Americas (1964) and the album titleTito No. 1. Cuban vocalist Miguelito Valdés and Machito appealed to the two combatants in the Valdés-penned song ‘Que Pena Me Da’ (How Sorry I Feel) on their 1963 collaboration Reunion. Tito and his band accompanied singer Nelson Pinedo (b. Barranquilla, Colombia) on his Musicor release A Latin In America.
Bad deals and conflict with his colleagues over pay led him to disband and move to Puerto Rico in 1966. Negative attitudes towards ‘Nuyoricans’ (New York Puerto Ricans) initially prevented him from breaking into Puerto Rican television, but he managed to get a show when the parent company of United Artists acquired one of the island’s channels. Guests like Shirley Bassey, Tony Bennett and Sammy Davis Jnr. appeared on his programme. He believed that anti-Nuyorican sentiment was also the reason why he did not receive an award for the show. Feeling rejected by his own people, Tito moved to Coral Gables in Miami, USA. He returned to New York and slayed the capacity audience at the Manhattan Center with the title track of Estoy Como Nunca (I’m As Good As Ever). El Doctor (1968) contained ‘Esa Bomba’, his last rivalry tune aimed at Puente. He was accompanied to Puerto Rico by arranger/saxophonist Ray Santos, who joined his band in 1963. A graduate of New York’s Juilliard School of Music, Santos did stints with Al Santiago’s Chack-a-nunu Boys, Noro Morales (twice), Machito and Tito Puente between the early 50s and 1962. He remained in Puerto Rico to work as a contractor for shows in the major hotels until 1984, when he returned to New York and took up a teaching post at the City College of New York. In 1991, Santos was hired to work on the music for the Hollywood movie adaptation, The Mambo Kings, of the Oscar Hijuelos novel The Mambo Kings Play Songs Of Love (1989).
Rodríguez first displayed signs of illness in 1967 while making one of his last television shows. He decided to found his own TR Records label in 1969 and while waiting for medical test results in the UK, he used British musicians to record the music for his first TR album, Involvidable/Unforgettable. It was confirmed that he had leukaemia but he insisted that the results be kept secret. TR Records, Inc. was launched in August 1971 and his second album on the label, Palladium Memories, sold well. He teamed up with Louie Ramírez for the third release, Algo Nuevo. Tito’s 25th Anniversary Performance, recorded in a nightclub in Perú, was issued a month before his death. The album provoked speculation about whether he had intended it to be a farewell. Rodríguez’s last appearance was with Machito and his band at Madison Square Garden on 2 February 1973. He finally lost the battle with leukaemia and 26 days later, Tito died in Tobi’s arms.

Broadcast Highlights Episodes 1-6:
1. Xavier Cugat Tito Rodriguez Noro Morales “Bim Bam Bum”
2. Enric Madriguera Tito Rodriguez “Un Dos Tres Un Dos”
3. Noro Morales Tito Rodriguez “Tambo”
4. Noro Morales Tito Rodriguez “La Reina De La Rumba”
5. Noro Morales Tito Rodriguez “El Buen Borincano”
6. Jose Curbelo Tito Rodriguez “Rumba Rumbero”
7. Jose Curbelo Tito Rodriguez “Que Siga la Rumba”
8. Machito Chano Pozo Tito Rodriguez “Porque Tu Sufres”
9. Tito Rodriguez Los Lobos Del Mambo “Donde Estabas Tu”
10. Tito Rodriguez y Los Lobos Del Mambo “Mama Guela”
11. Tito Rodriguez – “Tremendo Cumban” Tico Records
12. Tito Rodríguez – “Roy Roy Mambo” Tico Records
13. Tito Rodríguez – “Bésame Mucho” Tico Records
14. Tito Rodríguez – “Mambo En El Rio” Tico Records
15. Tito Rodríguez – “Ritmo y Melodía” Tico Records
16. Tito Rodriguez – La Playa Sextet “Separala También”
17. Tito Rodriguez – “Vuela la Paloma”
18. Tito Rodríguez – “Cuando Cuando Cuando”
19. Tito Rodríguez – “Cara De Payaso”
20. Tito Rodriguez – “Summertime” – Birdland 1961
21. Tito Rodriguez – “Mack the Knife” – Birdland 1961
22. Tito Rodriguez – “Estoy Como Nunca”
23. Tito Rodriguez – “Bilongo”
24. Tito Rodriguez – “Esa Bomba”

The Life And Music Of Tito Rodríguez
Final Episode https://lnkd.in/eWYXyEx
1. Tito Rodriguez – Inolvidable
2. Tito Rodríguez Louie Ramírez – El Mulato Rumbero
3. Tito Rodriguez – Lo Mismo Que A Usted

Tito Rodriguez Memorial Photo Album https://lnkd.in/bRuiRWP

Presented by: Luis Chaluisan WEPAwebTV – New Edge Theater rWEPAwebTV WEPAwebTV Roughrican Productions Rocker Roller Rican vlɒɡ Salsamagazine.com 2014 Recognition Awards Maria Hernandez Federico Chaluisan L.f. Chaluisan Batlle Editors WEPAwebTV – New Edge Theater El Extreme Luis Chaluisan Tito Rodriguez Jr
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It is important that we do not let our culture go unrecognized. Tito Rodriguez is important

Tito Rodriguez

Tito Rodriguez

Es importante que no permitamos que nuestra cultura no sea reconocida. Tito Rodríguez es un importante contribuyente a nuestro legacia musical. Hay 1,413 firmas hasta ahora para dar Tito Rodríguez un Premio Grammy póstumo. Tomar un momento para firmar la petición si usted no lo ha hecho. http://www.gopetition.com/…/the-recording-academy-posthumou…
It is important that we do not let our culture go unrecognized. Tito Rodriguez is an important contributor to our musical legacy. There are 1,413 signatures so far to give Tito Rodriguez a posthumous Grammy Award. Take a moment to sign the petition if you have not done so already. http://www.gopetition.com/…/the-recording-academy-posthumou…

Pablo Rodríguez, 4 January 1923, Santurce, San Juan, Puerto Rico, d. 28 February 1973, New York University Hospital, New York, USA. Vocalist, percussionist, band leader, composer, producer, label boss Tito Rodríguez was ‘equally talented as an uptempo improvising sonero (singer in the salsa style) and a romantic singer’. ‘At its peak, the Rodríguez band’s blend of Cuban-orientated numbers and tight, solo-filled instrumentals equalled any of his rivals’ (quotes from The Latin Tinge by John Storm Roberts, 1979). At the age of 16 he played maracas and sang second voice with Cuarteto Mayari before relocating to New York to live with his older brother Johnny (b. 10 October 1912, Camuy, Puerto Rico), who had moved there in 1935. Popular vocalist/composer Johnny formed his own trio in 1940; recordings he made with his trio on the Seeco label were collected on Encores De Johnny Rodríguez Y Su Trio and Siempre Favoritas De Johnny Rodríguez Y Su Trio.
Rodríguez’s first job in the city was with Cuarteto Caney. After brief stints with Enric Madriguera and Xavier Cugat (as a singer and bongo player), a year in the US Army was followed by a spell singing with Noro Morales. El Dinamico Tito Rodríguez was a reissue of a Morales collection with Tito. In 1946 Cuban pianist/composer José Curbelo recruited Rodríguez and Tito Puente (on timbales) to his band, which became an ‘incubator’ for the future New York mambo sound. Recordings made by Curbelo’s band during the two years of Tito’s period of tenure were later compiled on Los Reyes Del Mambo. In 1946, while Curbelo’s band were appearing at the China Doll nightclub, Rodríguez met a Japanese American chorus girl called Tobi Kei (b. Takeku Kunimatzu, 23 January 1925, Bellingham, Washington, USA), whom he married a few months later. In February 1947, while he was still with Curbelo, Tito participated in a recording session by Chano Pozo for Gabriel Oller’s SMC label, which included the Machito band, Arsenio Rodríguez and Miguelito Valdés. Curbelo sacked Rodríguez in 1947. The band leader had given him a day off to look after Tobi, who was sick, but someone informed Curbelo that Rodríguez spent the day drinking in a bar. Tito was unemployed for some months.
After leading a short-lived quintet, which he formed in late 1947, Rodríguez organized a trumpet conjunto (group) called the Mambo Devils in mid-1948. With them he recorded eight tunes for SMC, four of them arranged by Puente, who went on to become his musical antagonist. Tito later expanded his outfit to a big band, which he led until 1965. In 1949 he signed to Tico Records, formed in 1948 by two shirt label manufacturers, George Goldner and Art ‘Pancho’ Raymond. Rodríguez had to rename his band the Lobos Del Mambo (Mambo Wolves) as the aggrieved Oller objected to the use of Mambo Devils. He did two stints with the label, between 1949 and 1953 and between 1956 and 1958, during which time he released 78s, six 10-inch volumes of mambos and various 12-inch albums. Material from both these periods was later compiled on Nostalgia (1972) and Uptempo (1978). Tito made no records during 1950 because a wrangle between Goldner and Raymond suspended all recording at Tico. He resumed recording the following year when Goldner took charge of the label. In pursuit of the crossover market, Rodríguez switched to RCA Records in 1953 and his discs on the label sold well. Ritmo Y Melodia, 15 Joyas Tropicales (1990) was the most recent compilation of material culled from his RCA period. On his return to Tico, he issued Wa-Pa-Cha (1956). His final release for them was Señor Tito Rodríguez (1958). In 1960 he signed to United Artists Records on the basis that he would be the only Latin band leader to record for the company. His first album on the label, Live At The Palladium, was a great success. Conflict over top billing at New York’s famous Palladium Ballroom and elsewhere was an aspect of the rivalry that existed between Puente and Rodríguez.
In 1962, Rodríguez had three consecutive massive hits: ‘Vuela La Paloma’ (From West Side Beat), ‘Cuando, Cuando’ (from Back Home In Puerto Rico) and ‘Cara De Payaso’ (from Tito Rodríguez’ Hits), which were all number 1 in Puerto Rico and other South American countries. Rodríguez and his band recorded Back Home In Puerto Rico during a two-week stay on the island in June 1962. His return was marked by official government receptions and heavy media coverage. He tried to find fame in Las Vegas with a revue, but it flopped and he made a heavy financial loss. Tito also recorded as lead singer with La Playa Sextet, whose line-up substituted the electric guitar of their Puerto Rican leader, Payo Alicea, for traditional piano. A compilation of La Playa Sextet cuts with Tito on lead vocals was issued under the title, Tito Dice… Separala Tambien!. In 1963 he issued the Latin jazz Live At Birdland, which featured the jazz musicians Zoot Sims, Clark Terry, Bob Brookmeyer, Al Cohen and Bernie Leighton. The same year Tito had a huge hit of over one-and-a-half million sales with the smoochy string laden bolero ‘Inolvidable’ (Unforgettable), contained on From Tito Rodríguez With Love. The song was written by Cuban band leader/pianist Julio Gutiérrez. He followed this with a series of soft romantic bolero albums, interspersed with uptempo collections like Tito Tito Tito, on which accompanist Israel ‘Cachao’ López’s championing of Latin jam sessions (descargas) was spotlighted on the opening track ‘Descarga Cachao’. The Rodríguez/Puente feud was reflected on some of the recordings Tito made for Musicor Records, such as ‘Avisale A Mi Contrario Que Aqui Estoy Yo’ (Tell My Adversary I’m Here) from Carnival Of The Americas (1964) and the album titleTito No. 1. Cuban vocalist Miguelito Valdés and Machito appealed to the two combatants in the Valdés-penned song ‘Que Pena Me Da’ (How Sorry I Feel) on their 1963 collaboration Reunion. Tito and his band accompanied singer Nelson Pinedo (b. Barranquilla, Colombia) on his Musicor release A Latin In America.
Bad deals and conflict with his colleagues over pay led him to disband and move to Puerto Rico in 1966. Negative attitudes towards ‘Nuyoricans’ (New York Puerto Ricans) initially prevented him from breaking into Puerto Rican television, but he managed to get a show when the parent company of United Artists acquired one of the island’s channels. Guests like Shirley Bassey, Tony Bennett and Sammy Davis Jnr. appeared on his programme. He believed that anti-Nuyorican sentiment was also the reason why he did not receive an award for the show. Feeling rejected by his own people, Tito moved to Coral Gables in Miami, USA. He returned to New York and slayed the capacity audience at the Manhattan Center with the title track of Estoy Como Nunca (I’m As Good As Ever). El Doctor (1968) contained ‘Esa Bomba’, his last rivalry tune aimed at Puente. He was accompanied to Puerto Rico by arranger/saxophonist Ray Santos, who joined his band in 1963. A graduate of New York’s Juilliard School of Music, Santos did stints with Al Santiago’s Chack-a-nunu Boys, Noro Morales (twice), Machito and Tito Puente between the early 50s and 1962. He remained in Puerto Rico to work as a contractor for shows in the major hotels until 1984, when he returned to New York and took up a teaching post at the City College of New York. In 1991, Santos was hired to work on the music for the Hollywood movie adaptation, The Mambo Kings, of the Oscar Hijuelos novel The Mambo Kings Play Songs Of Love (1989).
Rodríguez first displayed signs of illness in 1967 while making one of his last television shows. He decided to found his own TR Records label in 1969 and while waiting for medical test results in the UK, he used British musicians to record the music for his first TR album, Involvidable/Unforgettable. It was confirmed that he had leukaemia but he insisted that the results be kept secret. TR Records, Inc. was launched in August 1971 and his second album on the label, Palladium Memories, sold well. He teamed up with Louie Ramírez for the third release, Algo Nuevo. Tito’s 25th Anniversary Performance, recorded in a nightclub in Perú, was issued a month before his death. The album provoked speculation about whether he had intended it to be a farewell. Rodríguez’s last appearance was with Machito and his band at Madison Square Garden on 2 February 1973. He finally lost the battle with leukaemia and 26 days later, Tito died in Tobi’s arms.

Presented by: Luis Chaluisan WEPAwebTV – New Edge Theater WEPAwebTV Roughrican Productions Rocker Roller Rican vlɒɡ Salsamagazine.com 2014 Recognition Awards Maria Hernandez Federico Chaluisan L.f. Chaluisan Batlle Editors WEPAwebTV – New Edge Theater El Extreme Luis Chaluisan Tito Rodriguez Jr
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Plugola and Payola in The Latin Music Industry Luis Chaluisan Salsa Magazine

Salsa Magazine’s International Follower Base Delivers 3,259,068 viewers in support of Live Music and History Plus Free Of FCC Investigations of Plugola and Payola. https://plus.google.com/u/0/+LuisChaluisan

plugola
Plugola is the illicit business practice of endorsing a product or service on radio or television for personal gain, without the consent of the network or stations. “Pluggers” have been known to accept bribes of money, alcohol, or free products and services. This contrasts greatly from commercial sponsorship because the benefits of the endorsement go to the individual talent or programmers, while the stations and networks receive no revenue.

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Payola, in the music industry, is the illegal practice of payment or other inducement by record companies for the broadcast of recordings on commercial radio in which the song is presented as being part of the normal day’s broadcast. Under U.S. law, 47 U.S.C. § 317, a radio station can play a specific song in exchange for money, but this must be disclosed on the air as being sponsored airtime, and that play of the song should not be counted as a “regular airplay”.
The term has come to refer to any secret payment made to cast a product in a favorable light (such as obtaining positive reviews).
Some radio stations report spins of the newest and most popular songs to industry publications. The number of times the songs are played can influence the perceived popularity of a song.
The term payola is a combination of “pay” and “-ola” a common suffix of product names in the early 20th century, such as Pianola, Victrola, Amberola, or Crayola.[Payola has come to mean the payment of a bribe in commerce and in law to say or do a certain thing against the rules of law, but more specifically a commercial bribe. The FCC defines “payola” as a violation of the sponsorship identification rule that in 2005-06 resulted in tens of millions of dollars in fines to cable corporations in New York.

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Presented by: Luis Chaluisan WEPAwebTV – New Edge Theater WEPAwebTV Roughrican Productions Rocker Roller Rican vlɒɡ Salsamagazine.com 2014 Recognition Awards Maria Hernandez Federico Chaluisan L.f. Chaluisan Batlle Editors WEPAwebTV – New Edge Theater El Extreme Luis Chaluisan https://www.facebook.com/groups/salsamagazine/

Salsa Magazine 2015 Recognition: Acknowledgement of Integrity As Musicians. Luis Chaluisan

Integridad

On October 9th, 2015 we are releasing the complete list of musicians from across the world we consider to be positive contributors to the advancement of Latino Music and Culture. The nominees biographies are featured February 1, 2015 – September 30, 2015. https://www.facebook.com/groups/salsamagazine/

1. Millie Puente
2. Tito Rodriguez Jr
3. Coati Mundi
4. Los Hermanos Moreno
5. Papo Vazquez
6. Moisés Cancel El Sexteto De La Salsa
7. Wilson Chembo Corniel
8. Gino Castillo
9. Peter Vega Y Mayaguez Big Band
10. Viktor Amauri Balaguer y “Los Callejeros”
11. Fe De Cuba
12. Luisito Rosario
13. Grupo La Negramenta
14. Jorge Papagofio Jr Alonso
15. Tito Guadalupe
16. Casimiro JR Rodriguez
17. Reinaldo Titi Ortiz
18. Pedro Pocholo Segundo
19. David Lucca
20. Marcos Herman Freddy Colon
21. Edwin Pabon
22. Deborah Magdalena
23. Hector Manuel
24. Angel Trinidad “Choco”
25. Nandy Rosario
26. Jose Ortiz “Dr. Drum Bombayo”
27. Orlando Ortiz
28. Ray Carrion
29. Loco Mic
30. Rene Camacho
31. Zaccai Curtis
32. Adriel Gonzalez
33. Abigail Ray Hillman Abby Ray
34. David Goya Gonzalez
35. Carlos Jimenez
36. Miss YaYa Vargas
37. Guillermo Bubba Faz

Salsa Magazine Reconocimiento 2015: Reconocimiento de Integridad como músicos. El 09 de octubre 2015 evamos a lanzar la lista completa de los músicos de todo el mundo que consideramos ser factores positivos para el avance de la Música Latina y Cultura. Las biografías de los nominados se ofrecen 1 febrero 2015 hasta 30 septiembre 2015.

Salsa Magazine-WEPAwebTV Bank of Interviews/Biographies
1. https://vimeo.com/wepawebtv
2. https://vimeo.com/user7797966

Presented by Luis Chaluisan WEPAwebTV – New Edge Theater WEPAwebTV Roughrican Productions Rocker Roller Rican vlɒɡ Salsamagazine.com 2014 Recognition Awards Maria Hernandez Federico Chaluisan L.f. Chaluisan Batlle Tina Chaluisan Editors WEPAwebTV – New Edge Theater El Extreme Luis Chaluisan

Salsa Magazine Reconocimiento 2015: Reconocimiento de Integridad como músicos Luis Chaluisan

Luis Chaluisan Salsa MagazineSalsa Magazine Reconocimiento 2015
Reconocimiento de Integridad como músicos

Millie Puente  

Miss Sifu (Nicaury Lamadrina Rodriguez)

Marcos Herman Freddy Colon


Luisito Rosario


Casimiro JR Rodriguez


Noel Quintana


Frankie Morales


Jorge Papagofio Jr Alonso


Jose Ortiz

El 09 de octubre 2015 evamos a lanzar la lista completa de los músicos de todo el mundo que consideramos ser factores positivos para el avance de la Música Latina y Cultura. Las biografías de los nominados se ofrecen 1 febrero 2015 hasta 30 septiembre 2015.

El Extreme Luis Chaluisan Poet
Salsa Magazine 2015 Recognition: Acknowledgement of Integrity As Musicians. On October 9th, 2015 we are releasing the complete list of musicians from across the world we consider to be positive contributors to the advancement of Latino Music and Culture. The nominees biographies are featured February 1, 2015 – September 30, 2015.
Presented by/presentado por: Luis Chaluisan
http://www.luischaluisan.com/ 
Salsa Electric CabaretPresented by WEPAwebTV – New Edge Theater VWEPAwebTV WEPAwebTV Roughrican Productions Rocker Roller Rican vlɒɡSalsamagazine.com 2014 Recognition Awards Federico Chaluisan L.f. Chaluisan Batlle Editors WEPAwebTV – New Edge Theater