Salsa B Boy Face Off a la Boogie Man Luis Chaluisan Salsa Magazine 6,572 members (114 new) ·

Salsa B Boy  Face Off a la Boogie Man https://vimeo.com/95920435

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Mixing three generations of dance, music and style. It’s A North Bronx Thing.
Double Vocal by: El Extreme Luis Chaluisan
Written by:  Harry Wayne Casey / Richard Finch
Processed on Flip Recorder
Edited on Windows Movie Maker
roughrican productions (c) 2014
https://www.facebook.com/El.Extreme.Luis.Chaluisan
“I’m Your Boogie Man” is a song originally performed by KC and the Sunshine Band from their 1976 album Part 3. Disco is a genre of music that peaked in popularity in the late 1970s, though it has since enjoyed brief resurgences including the present day. The term is derived from discothèque (French for “library of phonograph records”, but subsequently used as proper name for nightclubs in Paris . Its initial audiences were club-goers from the African American, gay, Italian American, Latino, and psychedelic communities in New York City and Philadelphia during the late 1960s and early 1970s.Disco also was a reaction against both the domination of rock music and the stigmatization of dance music by the counterculture during this period.

Salsa is a popular form of social dance that originated in New York with strong influences from Latin America, particularly Cuba and Puerto Rico. The movements of salsa have its origins in Cuban Son, Cha cha cha, Mambo and other dance forms, and the dance, along with the salsa music, originated in the mid-1970s in New York.

B-boying or breaking, also called breakdancing, is a style of street dance that originated among Black and Puerto Rican youths in New York City during the early 1970s. The dance spread worldwide due to popularity in the media, especially in regions such as the United Kingdom, Japan, Germany, France, Russia and South Korea. While diverse in the amount of variation available in the dance, b-boying consists of 3 kinds of movement/ formula breakin: toprock, footwork , and freezes. B-boying is typically danced to hip-hop, funk music, and especially breakbeats, although modern trends allow for much wider varieties of music along certain ranges of tempo and beat patterns.

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